20 FEBRUARY 2016: IN FULL BLOOM by Chris Denovan

Date:09 March, 2016

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Christopher Denovan– In Full Bloom

In this body of work, Christopher Denovan explores his subjective view of the beauty of nature in full-bloom through the medium of oil paint on Canvas.

This selection of paintings emulates a confidence and understanding of the importance of celebrating and documenting the fragility and supremacy of humankind. The artist has elevated his subjects which are already found on a pedestal revealing true beauty that the artist sees in nature and humans.

He has quietly attributed a greater sense of power to the sitter by highlighting the sitters and all mankind’s delight of attention and enjoyment of one’s own beauty. The scale of the paintings gives them even greater grandeur, as they are larger than life and demand attention from the viewer.

The artist’s inclusion of nature by adorning his subjects with a wreath of beautiful flowers is done to not only heighten the aesthetics of the work but also to give greater meaning to the idea of beauty within time. When one sees a painted flower, an element in natures whose life cycle is one of the quickest we are reminded sharply of the fragility of life and death. In all of these works the artist is trying to capture a moment in-between these two states, the moments when the flower is at its most beautiful and tenuous; in full bloom.

By painting a portrait of a person, the same symbolism can apply. In this case as in many, the artist seeks to capture what they find beautiful as in their subject. The painting of a person will remain timeless, unlike the real person who will carry on aging, eventually returning to the earth, becoming invisible.

The act of depicting a sculpture in a painting can be seen as a greater act of immortalization. The artist’s decision to use the subject that has already been chosen by another gives greater evidence to the value of the subject. The subject is yet removed again from the dimension of time and creates a greater tension of its worth.

Unlike early Vanitas that show wilting flowers, skulls and decaying fruit, Denovan’s paintings celebrates the height of nature’s beauty. The aesthetic of the paintings are beautified even further by the use of pleasing colour pairing and thick, visible brushstrokes, evidence of the artists hand and subjectivity.

 

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